WHAT SOME PEOPLE ARE SAYING ABOUT LURRIE BELL’S “THE DEVIL AIN’T GOT NO MUSIC”

WHAT SOME PEOPLE ARE SAYING ABOUT LURRIE BELL’S “THE DEVIL AIN’T GOT NO MUSIC”

“This is the record Bell was born to make, the best of his career.
It’s true redemption for a wayward bluesman, an inspiration and a
blessing for Bell’s fans who have been praying for him for years.”

(Grant Britt/No Depression)

This is a great album. Bell effortlessly blends the raw power and
emotion of blues music with the magnificent spirit of gospel. No matter
which side of the devil’s music you are on, this music is moving and
powerful.”

 (Jim White/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

 “Four Stars” ― Lurrie Bell just might have made the record he was born to make.

The son of harp master Carey Bell, the Chicago guitarist brings his considerable
chops ― especially on acoustic here ― to a set of gospel and
like-minded songs. He’s not the first bluestender to mix up a
salvation-and-sin cocktail, but “The Devil Ain’t Got No Music” is a
mighty strong alloy…Joe Louis Walker, one of several guests, slips
his slide guitar into Mississippi Fred McDowell’s “It’s a Blessing” and
the album’s pinnacle, a reverent reading of Thomas Dorsey’s “Search Me
Lord.” The pleas there for restoration are heart-wrenching, even
without the aforementioned personal problems, and the spare production
by fellow bluesman Matthew Skoller keeps the bushels off of Bell’s
ever-brightening light.

 (Thomas Conner/Chicago Sun-Times)

 “I have always seen blues and gospel as two sides of the same
coin…Lurrie Bell blends the two for a sound that is powerful and
effective. His guitar work is flawless and his vocals are more
passionate than I have ever heard from the son of Carrie Bell…Lurrie
Bell has faced his demons and come out on top. The Devil Ain’t Got No
Music is a powerful piece of work,.. Bell delivers the goods in such a
way that the classics take on a whole new life. He hits the nail on the
head and drives it home with a power that has to be heard to be
believed.”

Bill Wilson/Billtown Blues)

“Lurrie Bell Remains A National Treasure…soulful, stirring new
record.”

 (Josh Hathaway/blindedbysound.com)

 

“a powerhouse set of gospel and gospel-influenced tunes.”

(Jon Gilbertson/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

“Bell’s gospel will stir your soul while making the devil nervous.”

(Jim Beal/San Antonio Express-News)

“That ol’ time religion still can reach my soul when it’s sung as close
to the bone as Lurrie Bell sings it here, a richly honest voice
praising God while giving the devil his due. This is blues and gospel
blended and bonded.  I thought of Elvis as I listened to Mr. Bell’s
version of “Peace in the Valley,” and I thought of Doc Watson and Ralph
Stanley on “Trouble in My Way,” …Check out Bell’s version of the Tom
Waits song, “Way Down in the Hole,” and listen for Joe Louis Walker’s
great slide guitar on “It’s a Blessing.” It might just get you up and
out on Sunday morning.”

(Jaime O’Neill/Chico News & Review)

“Lurrie Bell has released some classic music before, but to say that
he’s got his heart firmly planted into this one is a huge
understatement. This one is guaranteed to bring a lot of blessings and
good feelings for years to come!”

 (Chuck Dauphin/Music News Nashville)

“Lurrie Bell sings and plays the blues like the feelings and sounds are
burned into his soul.  This CD blends Lurrie Bell’s marvelous singing
and guitar playing with the efforts of a talented group of
professionals that produce a powerful blues and gospel message.”

(Robert Nicosia/Musicmanblog.com)

 “a fresh, new take on two of the oldest and most influential styles of
American music that deserves to be listened to a time or twelve.”

(Niklas Rodewald/Blues Rock Review)

“infectious…an album-length exploration of handclapping gospel blues―
unusually enough,  Chicago style.”

(Barry Mazor/Engine145.com)

This is arguably the finest disc Lurrie Bell has released. It focuses on that point where The Blues and Gospel Music intersect and interplay. It has the rawness and power that both possess and need in order to deliver the powerful punch, and fiery technique that both need to succeed.  This is a stunning fusion of these two branches of music, and shows the mutual roots of these two musical genres and yet  also shows the differences between them that is not only in content, but also in the delivery of the songs.

(Bob Gottlieb –  The Folk & Acoustic Music Exchange)

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